PressThis: How to Publish an Ebook: Resources for Authors | Jane Friedman #MondayBlogs


Image by Firmbee from Pixabay

 

For today’s post, I am sharing an article about #selfpublishing that has resources for writers and authors I’ve found to be useful. It has plenty of resources from ebook files, distributors, marketing, and more.


A round-up of the best resources and tools for how to publish an ebook.

About the only thing that remains constant in ebook publishing is that it changes—everything from the services to marketing strategies. Here, I regularly update best resources I know of related to learning to publish an ebook, finding the right e-publishing distributors and services, and staying on top of changes in the industry.

Creating Basic Ebook Files

Assuming you have a finished and polished manuscript ready to be published, your first task is to create an ebook file; EPUB is the industry standard ebook format accepted by nearly all retailers. Unfortunately, this cannot be done through a simple Word export, but many tools and services will help you prep an EPUB file. (While most retailers and distributors try to offer good Word-to-ebook conversion, results and quality vary tremendously. Use them with caution.)

  • Vellum: easy-to-use software for Mac users only to produce EPUB files
  • PressBooks: a WordPress-based system for producing both EPUB and print files
  • Scrivener: this writing software is not free, but it can export EPUB files
  • Apple Pages (can export EPUB files)
  • Sigil: an open-source software for producing EPUB files, requires some tech savvy
  • Reedsy: you can copy/paste your work into its free online editor, then export EPUB files
  • Draft2Digital: you can upload your Word doc for EPUB conversion even if you don’t use them as your distributor
  • Calibre: free software that’s useful for file conversion to/from EPUB, but some find it difficult to use

If you don’t want the headache of creating your own ebook files, check out the services at eBookPartnership.

Creating Enhanced, Multimedia, or Full-Color Ebooks

If you’re publishing a highly illustrated work, such as a children’s picture book, an enhanced ebook, or need to have a fixed layout book—where text doesn’t reflow from page to page—you’ll either need to hire someone or use a special portal for publishing and distributing your work.

  • KDP Kids’ Book Creator: for creating children’s picture books
  • Blurb: produces print + digital full-color books, with distribution to major retailers
  • Book Creator: iPad app for illustrated books, great for children’s authors
  • Again, if you need assistance preparing your ebook files, try eBookPartnership.

Choosing Your Ebook Retailers and Distributors

Ebook distribution to major retail outlets is free and fairly straightforward, at least once you have ebook files ready to go. (Your upfront costs are almost always connected to the effort of designing, formatting, and producing those files, whether the cover and the interior—not distribution.)

Assuming you have ebook files ready to go, you have a choice to make: Would you rather deal with each online retailer directly, or would you rather reach them through an ebook distribution service?

  • Working directly with online retailers usually means better profits, more control, and more access to marketing/promotion tools (but not always).
  • Working with ebook distribution services usually means giving up a percentage of your profits to the distributor, in exchange for the centralized administration and management of all your titles. Some ebook distributors can also reach outlets you can’t on your own, such as the library market, and may offer you helpful tools to optimize book sales and marketing.

The good news is that you don’t have to choose between working directly with online retailers and using ebook distributors, since it’s rare for any distributor to demand exclusivity. For example, you could choose to work directly with Amazon KDP to sell your ebooks on Amazon, then use an ebook distributor such as Draft2Digital or Smashwords to reach other retailers. Or you could choose to distribute directly to Amazon, Apple, Kobo, and Nook (by using their do-it-yourself portals), then use Smashwords to capture the rest of the market (such as Scribd and libraries).

Bottom line: There’s no one right way to go about it, since it depends on your time and resources, your books, and your marketing strategy. You can also change your mind at any time (although not without some administration hassle and sales downtime).

Most important ebook retailers in the English-language markets

  • Amazon. Probably sells 60-80% of all ebooks, more for some authors and titles.
  • Apple Books. Widely considered the No. 2 ebook retailer in U.S.
  • Barnes & Noble Nook Press. Sales have been dropping significantly over the last couple years.
  • Kobo. Gaining ground, international presence. Important for the Canadian market.

Key ebook distributors

  • Smashwords. The largest ebook distributor of self-published titles that’s been around the longest and has the widest reach, particularly to the library market. No upfront cost; they take a cut of your sales.
  • Draft2Digital. Similar to Smashwords, but smaller and more customer-service focused. They take a cut of your sales.

Optimizing Your Product Page and Description

When you upload your ebook to retailers, you need to craft strong book descriptions, research your best categories and keywords, and do whatever you can to increase the likelihood that someone who sees your book page on Amazon will make a purchase.

Sales, Marketing, and Promotion

By far the hardest part of ebook publishing is making readers aware your book exists—then convincing them to buy it.

 

(Click on the link below to continue reading.)

Source: How to Publish an Ebook: Resources for Authors | Jane Friedman

 

 

 

PressThis: Start Here: How to Self-Publish Your Book | Jane Friedman #MondayBlogs #selfpublishing


Hello everyone. I hope your weekend went well. Today’s post is for anyone who is looking to get into the self-publishing world. Getting straight to the point because I don’t take up too much of your time, the links below will take you straight to it. Or, if you like, you can click or tap the Source link to read the article in its entirety.

It’s very informative and I find the article to be helpful especially with more in-depth additional links inside the article. I’m not an expert on self-publishing nor have I started yet, though the article is long but has tools you’ll need to help you through the publishing process.

Take a look and check it out. I hope it can help you. Anyone who would like to add in the comments and/or links to additional resources, please do so. Have a safe day.


This is an introductory guide to the major self-publishing options available to authors today, and how to choose the right service for you.

Just as traditional publishing has transformed due to the rise of ebooks, today’s self-publishing market has transformed as well. Most self-published authors earn the bulk of their money from ebook sales. Furthermore, 85% or more of all US ebook sales happen through a single online retailer, Amazon. Anyone can make their ebook and print book available for sale in the most important market—Amazon—without paying a cent upfront.

That means the full-service POD publishers that used to make a killing are now largely irrelevant to most self-publishing success, even though you’ll find them advertising against Google search results for “self-publishing.” Don’t be immediately lured in; first understand your options, explained below…

  1. A Quick History of Self-Publishing
  2. The Most Common Ways to Self-Publish Today
  3. Self-Publishing: The DIY Approach I Recommend
  4. How Ebook Self-Publishing Services Work
  5. Creating Ebook Files
  6. How to Self-Publish a Print Book
  7. Investing in a Print Run: Yes or No?
  8. Print-on-Demand Recommendations
  9. Maximizing Your Book Sales
  10. More Resources

Source: Start Here: How to Self-Publish Your Book | Jane Friedman